Soapbox Science is back and bigger than ever!

Soapbox Science UK launch: Saturday 25 May 2019, Gabriel’s Wharf, Southbank, London - 2-5pm

Women in science will be celebrated across the globe this summer - at Soapbox Science, where female scientists take the stand to preach their passion, display their discoveries, and hype-up their hypotheses in cities all over the world.

Co-founded by ZSL (Zoological Society of London) scientist Dr Nathalie Pettorelli and Dr Seirian Sumner from UCL, the global series of free events sees expert scientists leave the lab and take to the streets to share their work at a series of open-air lectures, inspired by Hyde Park’s famous Speaker’s Corner.

Monni on the soapbox podium holding up an illustration of a beetle

Kicking off its ninth year in London on Saturday 25 May, the city’s Southbank will be transformed into an arena for learning and debate, engaging people from all walks of life with some of the UK’s most ground-breaking scientific research.

The inaugural event will feature 12 speakers from celebrated institutions across the UK, covering everything from quantum-powered engines to Alzheimer’s research.

Dr Nathalie Pettorelli, said: “Soapbox Science champions the vital role of women in science, whilst providing an exciting opportunity for the public to meet, engage and be inspired by game-changing female scientists.”

This year, Soapbox Science will take place in 20 cities across the UK and 13 countries around the world – including in Brazil, Argentina, Ghana, Nigeria & South Africa for the first time - making it the biggest event to date. 

Find out more about Soapbox Science

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