Endangered baby pangolin takes his first steps after rescue from poachers

A rescued young Sunda pangolin takes his first tentative steps after being released back into the wild in Thailand, in a series of photographs snapped by ZSL staff.

The Critically Endangered animal was being illegally kept in cramped conditions and constant darkness by a poacher, before being saved by ZSL staff and local park rangers. Nicknamed Kosin – inspired by the Thai name for the god Indra, celebrated as a friend to humanity - by his rescuers, the puppy-sized youngster, estimated to be under a year old, weighed just 1kg and measured 67-centimetres nose-to-tail.

Photo - Close-up photo of a baby Sunda pangolin approaching the camera

Believed to have been snatched at night by poachers searching for pangolins to sell, experts think Kosin was kept alive as the meat and scales of live pangolins reach a higher price on the black market than those of dead animals. 

Following his rescue, Kosin was given a thorough health check and despite his ordeal found to be in good condition. After a short period of monitoring he was ready to be returned to the wild. The team then transported him to a remote, safe place as far away from known poaching hotspots as possible and have been monitoring his release site ever since. They are pleased to report that no poachers have been seen there since his release, giving Kosin the best possible chance of survival.

Photo - close up photo of a baby Sunda pangolin's face as it inspects the camera

Dr Eileen Larney, ZSL Conservationist said: "It was an extraordinary moment to watch Kosin being released back into the wild and then take his first steps back to the wild, but sadly his story is rare. Our team was able to get to him in time, care for him and return him to the wild. Thanks to the support of our donors and our incredible team he has been given a precious second chance, something many thousands of his species do not get. 

"A single pangolin is worth up to three months' wages for rural villagers in Thailand and is considered as valuable as a lottery win.

Photo - Baby Sunda pangolin crossing a shallow stream in a forested area

"However, to combat the illegal pangolin trade we must stop poaching at the source. It's a complex puzzle which requires global collaboration to both reduce demand and increase protection. This story would have had a very different ending without the quick response of park rangers and ZSL's conservation partners. Like all pangolins, Kosin faces an uncertain future but in moments like this we have hope."

All eight species of pangolin are now threatened with extinction due to widespread poaching. Worldwide, pangolins are thought to be the most illegally trafficked mammal. A seizure of pangolin scales in April 2019 weighed 14 tonnes, representing about 36,000 individual animals. Estimates suggest more than 300 pangolins are poached from the wild every day.

Photo - Baby pangolin sniffing the dirt next to a shallow stream

ZSL is working in Thailand, Cameroon, Nepal, and the Philippines to protect pangolins and other Endangered species from illegal wildlife trade. The team collaborates with communities to raise awareness, find alternative sources of income and create protected habitats where pangolins can thrive.

Drawing on a hugely successful track record of empowering communities across Asia and Africa. – ZSL will continue to support communities in Nepal helping communities to plan and create environmentally sustainable ways to make a living and build the same opportunities for people in Kenya too – home to rhinos and elephants – through its UK Aid Match appeal - For People. For Wildlife. 

The future of wildlife and people are intertwined, and long-term success depends on solutions that work for everyone. Through the UK Aid Match appeal ZSL is working alongside rural communities in Nepal and Kenya to set up sustainable ways to make a living, empowering them to feed their families, build independent futures and protect the wildlife they live alongside. 

Give to ZSL by 31 December 2019 and the UK government will double all donations, up to £2million.

Find out more about #ForPeopleForWildlife
 

More news from ZSL

Photo - Close up camera trap image of a puma looking at the camera, with close forest behind it.

Through the collaboration, National Geographic’s community of Explorers were given the opportunity to contribute projects to Instant Wild.

Photo - Cameratrap image of an Asian elephant in a forest in Thailand

World-first analysis of natural rubber producers by ZSL’s SPOTT reveals transparency issues across sector.

Tight cropped photo of a young African elephant stood next to it's mother.

The FT Seasonal Appeal increases awareness of a chosen charity each year through dedicated editorial coverage of its work.