The environmental monitoring and conservation modelling team

The environmental monitoring and conservation modelling team is led by Dr Nathalie Pettorelli, the team includes several BSc, MSc, PhD and post-doc students, who are carrying research all over the world. 

 

Post docs

Aliénor Chauvenet

Ali started to work with me as a Master student, exploring processes shaping cheetah population dynamics in the Serengeti. She then went on doing a PhD (2009-2012), with a project focusing on modelling the dynamics of translocated populations. Her study species was the New Zealand endemic hihi (Notiomystis cincta) which, in the last 30 years, has been reintroduced to several islands and monitored consistently. Ali's PhD project was funded by AXA. She now works on the use of remote sensing to assess the natural capital.

Sophie Grange

Sophie obtained her PhD in Ecology from the University of Poitiers in 2006; she then undertook a post-doc in South Africa, where she worked on the modelling of the dynamics of large herbivore populations. Sophie is currently developping a project with us, on the determinants of space use in terrestrial vertebrates.

 

PhD students

Clare Duncan

Clare started her PhD in October 2013; before this, she did an internship and her MSc project with me. Her MSc project focused on the factors shaping the variability of carnivore home range size; her PhD project aims at unveiling best management strategies for mangroves under climate change. Clare is registered at UCL Geography Department; she is hoping to carry out her fieldwork in the Philippines.

Anne Hilborn

Anne started her PhD in October 2012. Her project aims at exploring the role of individual variability in shaping the quantitative links between prey and predator population dynamics. Anne is registered at Virginia Tech; she is about to start her fieldwork in the Serengeti National Park, Tanzania.

Farid Belbachir

Farid started his PhD in January 2008. His project aims at collating information on cheetah abundance and ecology in the Algerian Central Sahara, as well as exploring carnivore interactions with human communities in Central Sahara and western Saharan Atlas Mountains. One of the main outputs of Farid's work so far has been the production of wild cheetah pictures from the Ahaggar National Park, pictures which were obtained thanks to a network of camera traps deployed in the area.

Caitlin Douglas

Caitlin's PhD research investigates the drivers and processes of environmental change in a dryland riparian ecosystem: the ephemeral Swakop River in Namibia. More precisely, she is investigating how groundwater availability and the invasion of a non-native tree species (Prosopis glandulosa) influence native woody vegetation, and the associated impacts on wildlife. Caitlin started her PhD in October 2009.

Tammy Davies

Tammy's PhD project focuses on the Solomon Islands and aims to: (1) identify indicators for community-based monitoring of ecosystem services; (2) establish baseline data for assessing the extent to which key ecological services are threatened; and (3) determine how community based monitoring and research can be embedded in existing institutional structures to enhance local adaptive forest comanagement. Tammy started her PhD in October 2010.

Claudia Amphlett

Claudia's PhD project is expected to shed light on the potential impact of climate change on biodiversity in Africa, by looking at the links between drought occurrence, human-wildlife interactions, and potential increase in conflicts. Claudia is based at UCL, at the Anthropology department. She started her PhD in October 2010.

Sarah Brooke

Sarah's PhD project focused on the links between human-wildlife conflict and the delivery of ecosystem services in the Gobi desert. Sarah is based at UCL, at the Anthropology department. She started her PhD in October 2010.

Gianfranco Gliozzo

Gianfranco's PhD project focuses on the use of citizen science in conservation and the potential role of new technology to promote such an approach. Based at UCL, Gianfranco aims to explore how games can help raise conservation awareness and generate increased data collection, for the benefit of conservation. Gianfranco started his PhD in October 2011.

Andrew Jacobson, PhD Student
Andrew's PhD project focuses on predicting habitat suitability for cheetahs and wild dogs in Africa. In particular, his work aims to identify recovery areas, where the species could be successfully reintroduced. Andrew is registered at the department of Geography at UCL, and started his PhD in January 2013.

 

MSc,BSc, research assistants and interns

Georgia Coward

Georgia did her MSc in York, specialising on marine environmental management. Georgia joined us in September 2013; her internship is about exploring and defining the concept of megaparks.

 

Past students, research assistants & interns

Femke Broekhuis

Femke performed her Master project at the Institute in summer 2007. She was investigating habitat use in cheetah in the Serengeti National Park, Tanzania. Femke is now pursuing a PhD on habitat use in carnivores, in Oxford.

Irene Garonna
Irene was investigating changes in primary productivity on Makira, Solomon Islands, as part of her Bsc training at University College London. Irene finished her project in spring 2009.

Aisling Fowler
Aisling was investigating factors shaping reproductive synchrony in ungulates, as part of her Bsc training at University College London. Aisling finished her project in spring 2010.

Laurence Pidgeon
Laurence was investigating factors shaping reintroduction success in terrestrial vertebrates, as part of his Bsc training at University College London. Laurence finished his project in spring 2011.

Alizée Meillere
Alizée spent 5 months exploring primary productivity changes in Africa over the last three decades, as estimated by satellites. This internship was part of her cursus at ENSAT, France. Alizée left in February 2010.

Lidia Gonzalez
Lidia undertook a 3 month internship at the Institute, exploring primary productivity changes in Africa over the last three decades, as estimated by satellites. Lidia left in August 2010.

James Duffy
James undertook a 13 month internship at the Institute, exploring primary productivity changes in the global protected area network over the last three decades, as estimated by satellites. James joined Kevin Gaston's lab in December 2011.

William Cornforth
Will undertook a 13 month internship at the Institute, exploring primary productivity changes in the global protected area network over the last three decades, as estimated by satellites. Will started his PhD in Edinburgh in December 2011.

Terri Freemantle
Terri undertook a 8 month internship at the Institute, where she mainly focussed on using remote sensing information to evaluate the long term suitability of a reserve in Chad for oryx reintroduction. Terri left in June 2012.

Eric Ameca
Eric's PhD project (2009-2013) aimed at investigating the mechanisms behind the patterns shaping natural population die-offs (NPDOs) across mammalian populations. Eric did most of his studies in Mexico, where he is from, and an important part of his research was to predict the vulnerability of Mexican mammals to NPDOs focusing on the WWF Mexican biodiversity hotspots designated for priority conservation. Eric was a WWF Russell E.Train Fellow.

Annie English
Annie performed her Master project at the Institute in summer 2012. She was investigating the factors shaping breeding synchrony in ungulates. Her thesis was published in PLoS ONE.

Daniela Kretz
Daniela undertook a 6 weeks internship at the Institute in spring 2012. She was investigating the possibility of using Landsat data to map oil exploration activities in the Sahara. Her work is currently being reviewed for publication by Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society (B).

Daniel Kachelriess
Daniel carried out his MSc project at the Institute in spring/summer 2012. His project was about exploring the use of remote sensing data to inform the management of marine protected areas. His literature review was published in 2013, in Ecological Indicators.

Daniela Braun
Daniela carried out her MSc project at the Institute in fall 2012. Her project was about modelling future changes in the human footprint for Tanzania. Daniela is currently working on a paper, based on her MSc results.

Filip Reznick
Filip performed his MRes project at the Institute in spring 2013. He was investigating the impact of land use change on bat distribution in the Solomons. Filip is currently working on getting his thesis published.

Christopher Chandler
Chris performed his MRes project at the Institute in spring 2013. He was investigating how urbanization is affecting large vertebrate distribution in the Far East. Chris is currently working on getting his thesis published.

Lisa Wheeler
Lisa performed her Master project at the Institute in summer 2013. She was investigating the factors shaping zebra distribution in Kenya.

Judith Reise
Judith worked with me as a research assistant over the period March-September 2013. Her work at the Institute was about exploring the use of satellite remote sensing to monitor the natural capital, with a focus on Kenya.