Worldwide fish appeal successful

ZSL London Zoo’s international Fish Appeal finds lost Mangarahara cichlids in the wild.

Aquarists at ZSL London Zoo are celebrating the phenomenal success of a worldwide appeal to find a female mate for a critically-endangered fish species – after a small population was found in remote Madagascar.

The Mangarahara cichlid (Ptychochromis insolitus) was believed to be lost in the wild due to intense deforestation and river diversions created for rice farming and agriculture drying up its native habitat of the Mangarahara River in Madagascar, and two of the last known individuals – both male - were residing in ZSL London Zoo’s Aquarium.

After launching a desperate appeal in May 2013, hundreds of private aquarium owners, fish collectors, and scientists got in touch with the Zoo’s Aquarium Curator, Brian Zimmerman, to offer up advice, support and suggestions.

One of those to respond to the appeal was a farm and business owner in Madagascar, who recognised the fish as one he’d seen in a secluded north-Madagascan town.

An exploratory expedition was arranged with vital support from HM Ambassador Tim Smart, so that, along with aquarists from Toronto Zoo in Canada, Brian Zimmerman and Kienan Parbles from ZSL London Zoo could head off to Madagascar to search for the Mangarahara cichlid.

After days of searching empty streams, and rapidly losing hope of finding the cichlid, the team visited a tiny village built on the edge of a now-disconnected tributary from the Mangarahara River.

With help from local villagers, areas of water were cordoned off using nets to mark the search areas. Initially finding only other native species, the team were ecstatic when they finally found the first one of the last remaining Mangarahara cichlids in existence.

Mangarahara cichlid

Brian Zimmerman said: “We are simply thrilled that we found the Mangarahara cichlid surviving in Madagascar.

“We weren’t holding out much hope of finding any fish in the wild, as so much of the Mangarahara River now resembles the desert because of deforestation and intensive agricultural use.

“These cichlids have shown remarkable survival skills, and managed to find one of the very last remaining water sources to live in, but their numbers are tiny and the non-flowing water is not an ideal habitat for them. We’re now doing all we can to protect these remaining fish.”

As part of ZSL London Zoo’s Fish Net conservation project, which focuses on protecting freshwater species, Brian and the team moved 18 of the Mangarahara cichlids to a private aquaculture facility in Madagascar, where they will receive specialist care while conservation plans are made to bring the species back from the brink of extinction.

Tim Smart added “The Embassy is committed to helping preserve Madagascar’s unique biodiversity. As ZSL has demonstrated, fostering stronger British Malagasy ties is an important part of this. As such, I am most grateful to Dr Zimmerman and ZSL for their efforts to find and save the Mangarahara Cichlid. Its plight serves as a clear warning that Madagascar’s unique biodiversity is under severe threat from deforestation. We will continue to work with Malagasy, British and international partners to find ways to reverse this. Local community understanding and buy-in is key.”

More news from ZSL

New tamandua walking around rainforest life

A new South American anteater moves into Rainforest Life exhibit

Squirrel monkey with strawberry at ZSL London Zoo

Game, set and match for Zoo’s cheeky monkeys ZSL London Zoo’s squirrel monkeys enjoy strawberry treats for Wimbledon

All six Philippine crocodiles - first UK bred.

Critically-endangered crocodiles bred for first time in UK at ZSL London Zoo