Tapir (Malayan)

Tapir

What they look like

The largest of the four species of tapir, it is characterised by its long, fleshy, prehensile nose and distinctive black and white colouration designed to break up the outline of the body in the gloom of the forests in which it lives.

Animal facts

The tapir’s closest relatives are horses and rhinoceroses. They use their flexible top lip to help get leaves into their mouths.  The origins of the Tapiridae can be traced back at least fifty million years. Fossil evidence indicates that the tapirs are most closely related to rhinos. 

What they eat

Grasses, aquatic plants, leaves, buds, soft twigs and fruits of low-growing shrubs

Habitat

Dense primary rain forests of river basins or swamps

Where they live

Sumatra, Malay Peninsula and Southern Thailand

Threats

As for most animals, habitat loss is a big threat for tapirs, especially large scale conversion of lowland forest to oil palm plantations.

 

Population
Decreasing
Order
Perissodactyla
Family
Tapiridae
Life Span
Up to 30 years