How animals change the world

Professor Yadvinder Malhi: ‘How animals shape habitats, ecosystems and the global biosphere’

ZSL’s Stamford Raffles Lecture, Tuesday 20 June 2017, 6:30pm, ZSL London Zoo

From tiny termites to woolly mammoths, all animals past and present have helped to shape the environments in which they live. From the food they eat to the waste they leave behind, often these impacts are not just small scale, but extend to entire ecosystems. 

ZSL’s annual Stamford Raffles Lecture, named in honour of the founder of the Zoological Society of London, will see Professor Malhi from the University of Oxford’s School of Geography and the Environment explore the myriad ways in which animals help to shape the world around them and what this means for us, their human neighbours. 

Starting at the Pleistocene era and working through to modern times, Professor Malhi’s presentation – entitled How animals shape habitats, ecosystems and the global biosphere - will highlight how animals influence everything from wildfires to climate, illustrated with examples from historical data, ongoing studies and ‘rewilding’ projects around the world.

Professor Malhi will explore what understanding the impact of animals can reveal about past extinctions, as well as the vital role animals could play in helping ecosystems adapt to future pressures from human population growth. 

The most prestigious scientific talk in international conservation charity ZSL’s annual calendar, the Stamford Raffles Lecture is a chance to explore pressing conservation topics, debate solutions and explore future challenges. Open to all, advance booking is required, with tickets exclusively available. 

Find out more and book your place 

 

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