See a seahorse?

iSeahorse Explore allows anyone, anywhere in the world, to contribute to marine science and conservation via their smartphone, by simply logging a sighting every time they come across a seahorse in the wild.

“We know that seahorses are threatened by overfishing, destructive fishing practices, and habitat loss. Now we need to pinpoint populations and places that most need conservation action,” says Dr. Heather Koldewey, co-founder of Project Seahorse and Head of Global Conservation Programmes at ZSL.

Marine conservationists from the Zoological Society of London (ZSL), University of British Columbia (UBC), John G. Shedd Aquarium, and iNaturalist, who collaborated on the app development, are keen this will pave the way for similar efforts with other, difficult-to-study species.

With their small size and ability to blend into their surroundings, seahorses are difficult to study in the wild. Of the 48 seahorse species listed on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, 26 are considered ‘Data Deficient.’ iSeahorse Explore will expand the number of people studying seahorses in the wild from a handful of scientists to hundreds and potentially thousands of ‘citizen scientists’.

“We’ve made important scientific breakthroughs with seahorses in recent years, but they remain incredibly enigmatic animals,” says Dr. Amanda Vincent, Director of Project Seahorse, UBC and ZSL’s joint marine conservation initiative. “Working together with citizen scientists all over the world, we’ll accomplish big things for seahorses and other vulnerable marine species,” Dr Vincent added.

New features planned for the next phase of the iSeahorse website and smartphone app include sophisticated population monitoring and advocacy tools, as well as a social media component.

The iSeahorse iPhone app is available for download here. To learn more about iSeahorse and explore seahorse maps, species profiles, and other data, visit www.iseahorse.org
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